The paper presents a comparative analysis of the development and present state of compensation for victims of catastrophes in Belgium and the Netherlands. These two neighbouring countries have both seen legislative changes in this field in recent years, albeit with different outcomes. The paper thus analyses to what extent the two compensation scheme structures allow for conclusions as to the comparative benefits of a comprehensive insurance scheme for natural disasters. From the perspective of law and economics, the evolution of private insurance and public intervention through compensation funds, the preference for private or public solutions and the actual financing of these are examined. Drawing on practical experience, such as the case of flood risks, the solutions are tested in view of incentive-based financing. The paper concludes that the private insurance market is more developed in Belgium than it is in the Netherlands, where the reform process has not yet ended. © 2011 The Author(s). Disasters

Additional Metadata
Keywords Belgium, Compensation funds, First-party insurance, Flooding, Incentive-based financing, Natural catastrophes, The Netherlands
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7717.2010.01233.x, hdl.handle.net/1765/30918
Citation
Bruggeman, V, Faure, M.G, & Haritz, M. (2011). Remodelling reparation: Changes in the compensation of victims of natural catastrophes in Belgium and the Netherlands. Disasters, 35(4), 766–788. doi:10.1111/j.1467-7717.2010.01233.x