This exploratory study aimed to examine which components of early childhood conscience predicted bullying involvement around school entry. In the population-based Generation R Study, teacher reports of bullying involvement and parent reports of conscience were available for 3,244 children (M age=6.7 years). Higher levels of overall conscience predicted lower bullying perpetration scores, independently of intelligence quotient, temperamental traits and sociodemographic characteristics. Particularly, the subscales guilt, confession, and internalized conduct, and to a lesser extent empathy, predicted bullying perpetration. Conscience was not related to victimization. Similar results were found using observations during so-called 'cheating games' (subsample N = 450 children). Findings suggest that improving children's understanding of moral standards and norms may be a potential target for bullying intervention programs in early primary school.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Bullying, Childhood, Conscience, Moral development, Victimization
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1111/sode.12233, hdl.handle.net/1765/98005
Journal Social Development
Citation
Jansen, P.W, Zwirs, B.W.C, Verlinden, V.J.A, Mieloo, C.L, Jaddoe, V.W.V, Hofman, A, … Tiemeier, H.W. (2017). Observed and parent-reported conscience in childhood: Relations with bullying involvement in early primary school. Social Development. doi:10.1111/sode.12233