Adverse maternal lifestyle habits during pregnancy are important modifiable risk factors for pregnancy complications in Western countries. Most common adverse maternal lifestyle habits include smoking, alcohol consumption, and caffeine consumption. Although not directly lifestyle related, maternal age is also considered as a modifiable risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Generation R Study, lifestyle, pregnancy complications
Promotor A. Hofman (Albert)
Publisher Erasmus University Rotterdam
Sponsor The Generation R Study is conducted by the Erasmus Medical Center in close collaboration withthe School of Law and Faculty of Social Sciences of the Erasmus University Rotterdam, the MunicipalHealth Service Rotterdam area, Rotterdam, the Rotterdam Homecare Foundation, Rotterdamand the Stichting Trombosedienst & Artsenlaboratorium Rijnmond (STAR-MDC), Rotterdam. Wegratefully acknowledge the contribution of children and parents, general practitioners, hospitals,midwives and pharmacies in Rotterdam. The general design of Generation R Study is made possibleby financial support from the Erasmus MedicalCenter, Rotterdam, the Erasmus UniversityRotterdam,the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw), theNetherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO), the Ministry of Health, Welfare andSport and the Ministry of Youth and Families.The work presented in this thesis was conducted at the Generation R Study Group, the Departmentof Epidemiology and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Erasmus MedicalCenter, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Publication of this thesis was supported by the Generation RStudy Group, the Department of Epidemiology and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology,Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands, the Erasmus University Rotterdam, GEHealthcare and Bayer Healthcare B.V.
ISBN 978-946169-064-7
Persistent URL hdl.handle.net/1765/23493
Citation
Bakker, R. (2011, May 27). Maternal Lifestyle and Pregnancy Complications: The Generation R Study. Erasmus University Rotterdam. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1765/23493