Concerted efforts from national and international partners have scaled up malaria control interventions, including insecticide-treated nets, indoor residual spraying, diagnostics, prompt and effective treatment of malaria cases, and intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). This scale-up warrants an assessment of its health impact to guide future efforts and investments; however, measuring malaria-specific mortality and the overall impact of malaria control interventions remains challenging. In 2007, Roll Back Malaria's Monitoring and Evaluation Reference Group proposed a theoretical framework for evaluating the impact of full-coverage malaria control interventions on morbidity and mortality in high-burden SSA countries. Recently, several evaluations have contributed new ideas and lessons to strengthen this plausibility design. This paper harnesses that new evaluation experience to expand the framework, with additional features, such as stratification, to examine subgroups most likely to experience improvement if control programs are working; the use of a national platform framework; and analysis of complete birth histories from national household surveys. The refined framework has shown that, despite persisting data challenges, combining multiple sources of data, considering potential contributions from both fundamental and proximate contextual factors, and conducting subnational analyses allows identification of the plausible contributions of malaria control interventions on malaria morbidity and mortality.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.15-0363, hdl.handle.net/1765/102203
Journal American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Citation
Ye, Y, Eisele, T.P. (Thomas P.), Eckert, E. (Erin), Korenromp, E.L, Shah, J.A. (Jui A.), Hershey, C.L. (Christine L.), … Bhattarai, A. (Achuyt). (2017). Framework for evaluating the health impact of the scale-up of malaria control interventions on all-cause child mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 97, 9–19. doi:10.4269/ajtmh.15-0363