Recent European Court of Justice (ECJ) case law has highlighted apparent inconsistencies in ECJ rulings on the regulation of voluntary additional health insurance. In 2013, the ECJ upheld Belgian regulations limiting the operation of the free market by restricting increases in premium rates of additional health insurance contracts. By contrast, in 2012, an ECJ ruling required Slovenia to repeal such restrictive legislation and not to hinder the operation of the free market. The objective of this article is to feed the discussion on the question whether and under what conditions free-market-driven additional health insurance in the European Union might be acceptable. We conclude that, provided that basic health insurance effectively covers all essential healthcare (essential healthcare services being broadly defined), additional health insurance could be regulated in the same way as all other non-life insurance.

Additional Metadata
Keywords EU law, Free market, Insurance premium rate, Non-life insurance directives, Regulation, Voluntary health insurance
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1163/15718093-12460339, hdl.handle.net/1765/103440
Journal European Journal of Health Law
Citation
Calcoen, P.F.J, & van de Ven, W.P.M.M. (2017). Voluntary additional health insurance in the European union: Free market or regulation?. European Journal of Health Law, 24(5), 591–613. doi:10.1163/15718093-12460339