Background: Person-centred care and co-creation of care (productive interactions between clients and professionals) are expected to lead to better outcomes for clients. Professionals play a prominent role in the care of people with intellectual disabilities at residential care facilities. Thus, person-centred care and co-creation of care may be argued to lead to better outcomes for professionals as well. This study aimed to identify relationships of person-centred care and co-creation of care with the well-being and job satisfaction of professionals working with people with intellectual disabilities (PWID). Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2015 among professionals working at a disability care organisation in the Netherlands. All 1146 professionals involved in the care of people with intellectual disabilities who required 24-hours care were invited to participate. The response rate was 41% (n = 466). Results: Most respondents (87%) were female, and the mean age was 42.8 ± 11.5 years (22–65). The majority of respondents (70%) worked ≥22 hours per week and had worked for the organisation for ≥5 years (88%). Most of the respondents (76.8%) were direct care workers either in residential homes (59.3%) or in day activities (17.5%). After controlling for background variables, person-centred care and co-creation of care were associated positively with job satisfaction and well-being of professionals. Conclusions: The provision of person-centred care and co-creation of care may lead to better well-being and job satisfaction among professionals working with PWID. This finding is important, as such professionals often experience significant levels of work stress and burnout.

Additional Metadata
Keywords co-creation of care, intellectual disability, job satisfaction, person-centred care, professional, well-being
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1111/scs.12431, hdl.handle.net/1765/104940
Journal Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences
Citation
van der Meer, L, Nieboer, A.P, Finkenflügel, H.J, & Cramm, J.M. (2018). The importance of person-centred care and co-creation of care for the well-being and job satisfaction of professionals working with people with intellectual disabilities. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 32(1), 76–81. doi:10.1111/scs.12431