Previous studies reported a higher prevalence of venous-thromboembolic events among patients with Cushing disease (CD) compared to those with ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (CS) from adrenal sources. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the coagulation profile of patients with CS from different etiologies. A prospective observational study was conducted at a clinical research center. The study included adult patients admitted for evaluation of suspected CS (n=85), that were divided into 3 groups: CD (n=22), ACTH-independent CS from an adrenal tumor/hyperplasia (adrenal CS, n=21), and a control group consisting of subjects with negative screening for CS (rule-out CS, n=42). Coagulation profiles were drawn before and 8.5±4.3 months after surgery (trans-sphenoidal or adrenalectomy, n=18), and included fibrinogen, Factor VIII (FVIII), von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF:Ag), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), antithrombin III (ATIII), Protein C (PC), Protein S (PS), α2-antiplasmin (α2AP), and aPTT measurements. Patients with CD had higher baseline mean cortisol levels, ATIII activity and vWF:Ag levels compared with adrenal CS. Differences in ATIII activity and vWF:Ag levels remained even after controlling for BMI, and ATIII after also controlling for 24-h urinary free cortisol collections. Our study showed for the first time the differences in coagulation profiles between various etiologies of CS. We assume that the higher cortisol burden among CD patients may explain the differences found in the coagulation profile as well as the higher risk for VTE compared with primary adrenal CS patients.

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Keywords cushing syndrome, hypercoagulability, hypercortisolism, thrombus
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0043-100113, hdl.handle.net/1765/108202
Journal Hormone and Metabolic Research
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Citation
Tirosh, A. (Amit), Lodish, M.B, Lyssikatos, C. (Charalampos), Belyavskaya, E. (Elena), Feelders, R.A, & Stratakis, C.A. (2017). Coagulation Profile in Patients with Different Etiologies for Cushing Syndrome: A Prospective Observational Study. Hormone and Metabolic Research, 49(5), 365–371. doi:10.1055/s-0043-100113