The treatment of hormone hypersecretory syndromes caused by neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be a major challenge. NETs originating from the small intestine often secrete serotonin causing flushing, diarrhea and valve fibrosis, leading to dehydration or heart failure in severe cases. NETs from the pancreas can secrete a wider variety of hormones, like insulin, glucagon and gastrin leading to distinct clinical syndromes. Historically mortality in patients with functioning NETs was high due to the complications caused by the hypersecretion of hormones. This has been reduced with several drugs: proton-pump inhibitors decrease acid secretion caused by gastrinomas. Somatostatin analogs can inhibit the secretion of multiple hormones and these are now the cornerstone for treating patients with a gastroenteropancreatic NET. However, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs and everolimus can also decrease symptoms of hypersecretion and increase progression-free survival. Several factors affect the survival in patients with a functioning NET. Complications of hypersecretion negatively impact survival; however, secretion of hormones is also often a sign of a well-differentiated NET and due to the symptoms, functioning NETs can be detected in an earlier stage suggesting a positive effect on prognosis. The effect on survival is also dependent on the type of hormone being secreted. This review aims to study the effect of hormone secretion on the prognosis of NETs with the contemporary treatments options available today.

Additional Metadata
Keywords carcinoid syndrome, hormone secretion, neuroendocrine tumor, prognosis
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1530/ERC-16-0538, hdl.handle.net/1765/108574
Journal Endocrine-related cancer
Citation
Zandee, W.T, Kamp, K, van Adrichem, R.C.S, Feelders, R.A, & de Herder, W.W. (2017). Effect of hormone secretory syndromes on neuroendocrine tumor prognosis. Endocrine-related cancer (Vol. 24, pp. R261–R274). doi:10.1530/ERC-16-0538