This article examines the social construction of indie-folk as a genre, defined not primarily as an aesthetic category but as a tool and resource of social differentiation. Drawing from 48 in-depth interviews with musicians, gatekeepers, and audience members, the discourse of indie-folk is analyzed, focusing on how Dutch community members draw social and symbolic boundaries. Analysis shows that they are “poly-purists,” a type of cultural omnivores who consume a broad variety of musical genres yet by staying within the confines of the indie music stream rather than adopting a politics of ‘anything goes.’ By transposing the aesthetic disposition to the historically lowbrow phenomenon of folk music, community members distinguish ‘authentic’ folk from mainstream pop and dance, lowbrow country, and highbrow jazz and classical music. Simultaneously, they choose within these and other genres those items that match their ‘quality’ taste. Therefore, this study classifies indie-folk as a rising genre and contributes to existing research on cultural hierarchy and diversity, arguing that the emergence and institutionalization of indie-folk is part of the ongoing historical narrative of a Kantian aesthetics emphasizing the disinterested nature of artistic evaluation.

Additional Metadata
Keywords authenticity, cultural omnivores, distinction, genre, indie, symbolic boundaries
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1057/s41290-017-0033-y, hdl.handle.net/1765/109296
Journal American Journal of Cultural Sociology
Rights No subscription
Citation
van Poecke, N. (2017). Pure taste in popular music: The social construction of indie-folk as a performance of “poly-purism”. American Journal of Cultural Sociology, 1–33. doi:10.1057/s41290-017-0033-y