Surveys among pharmacists and physicians show that these healthcare professionals have successfully adopted the concept of pharmacogenomics (PGx).1-3 In addition, patients are willing to consent to participate in PGx implementation studies.4 However, the surveys also show that healthcare professionals do not frequently order or recommend a PGx test.1,2 Among others, a frequently perceived hurdle for clinical uptake of PGx is the availability of guidelines translating PGx test results into clinical actions for individual patients.5,6.

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Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1002/cpt.1049, hdl.handle.net/1765/111220
Journal Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Citation
Swen, J.J, Nijenhuis, M, van Rhenen, M. (Mandy), de Boer-Veger, N.J. (Nienke J.), Buunk, A.-M. (Anne-Marie), Houwink, E.J.F. (Elisa J.F.), … Guchelaar, H.J. (2018). Pharmacogenetic Information in Clinical Guidelines: The European Perspective. Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (Vol. 103, pp. 795–801). doi:10.1002/cpt.1049