In May 2017, the Ogiek indigenous community of Kenya successfully challenged the denial of their land and associated rights before the African Court of Human and Peoples Rights (‘the Court’). In the first indigenous peoples’ rights case considered the Court, and by far the largest ever case it has had to consider, the Court found violations of Articles 1, 2, 8, 14, 17 (2) and (3), 21 and 22 of the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights (‘the African Charter’). It therefore created a major legal precedent. In addition, the litigation itself and Ogiek’s participation in the various stages of the legal process provided a model for community engagement, through which the Ogiek were empowered to better understand and advocate for their rights. This article will first explain the history of the case and the Court’s findings, and then move on to examine in further detail methods employed to build the Ogiek’s capacity throughout, and even beyond, the litigation.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.5553/ELR.000095, hdl.handle.net/1765/112648
Series Erasmus Law Review
Journal Erasmus Law Review
Citation
Claridge, L. (2018). Litigation as a Tool for Community Empowerment: The Case of Kenya’s Ogiek. Erasmus Law Review, 11(1), 57–66. doi:10.5553/ELR.000095