The maxim ‘law in books and law in action’ relays an implicit dichotomy, and though the constitutive nature of law is nowadays commonly professed, the reflex remains to use law in books as an autonomous starting point. Law however, it is argued in this article, has a storyline that commences before its institutional formalisation. Law as ‘a continuous process of becoming’ encompasses both law in books and law in action, and law in action encompasses timelines both before and after the formal coming about of law. To fully understand law, it is necessary to understand the entire storyline of law. Qualitative studies in law and society are well equipped to offer valuable insights on the facets of law outside the books. The insights are not additional to doctrinal understanding, but part and parcel of it. To illustrate this, an ethnographic case study of local bylaws regulating an ethnically diverse public space of everyday life is expanded upon. The case study is used to demonstrate the insights qualitative data yields with regard to the dynamics in which law comes about, and how these dynamics continue for law in action after law has made the books. This particular case study moreover exemplifies how law is one of many truths in the context in which it operates, and how formalised law is reflect

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.5553/ELR.000104, hdl.handle.net/1765/112692
Series Erasmus Law Review
Journal Erasmus Law Review
Citation
Chevalier, D. A. M. (2018). ‘A Continuous Process of Becoming’: The Relevance of Qualitative Research into the Storylines of Law. Erasmus Law Review, 11(2), 93–104. doi:10.5553/ELR.000104