Objectives: The aims of this study were: (1) to identify which measurement instruments are used in practice to assess the quality of life or well-being of individuals with and without (sub)fertility; (2) to describe the design and outcomes of studies comparing quality of life or well-being of individuals with and without fertility problems; and (3) to determine which of the outcomes of the identified studies could be used in cost-utility studies.
Methods: A systematic literature review was performed of studies published before July 2018, using multiple databases. Included studies investigated (health-related) quality of life or well-being of individuals with fertility problems. The applied instruments were assessed, as were the outcomes and suitability for use in cost-utility studies.
Results: Twenty-six studies met the inclusion criteria. Twelve distinct instruments of measurement were applied: two generic quality-of-life instruments, five generic well-being instruments and five disease-specific instruments. Most studies found negative associations in one or more domains assessing fertility problems and quality of life or well-being. However, two studies found the opposite. None of the studies reported outcomes relevant for cost-utility studies.
Conclusion: Quality of life and well-being related to having fertility problems are regularly studied. However, the reported information is not suitable for use in cost-utility studies. There is a clear need for studies investigating the impact of fertility problems on quality of life in a way that outcomes can be compared across studies and disease areas.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Cost-utility, fertility, infertility, measurement, instruments, quality of life, subfertility, well-being
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1080/13625187.2018.1539161, hdl.handle.net/1765/112810
Journal European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care
Citation
Hubens, K, Arons, A.M.M, & Krol, H.M. (2018). Measurement and evaluation of quality of life and well-being in individuals having or having had fertility problems: a systematic review. European Journal of Contraception and Reproductive Health Care. doi:10.1080/13625187.2018.1539161