By 2050, the majority of the world’s population will live in cities (United Nations, 2015). Human mobility across urban areas and the answers cities will give to migration and diversity will be critical for their economic development and their place in an increasingly global context. From a migrant’s point of view, nations and states are seen as mere restrictions for their personal mobility among cities. Migration-related diversity in cities has been increasing, and in a growing number of cities more than one-third or even more than half of the urban population has a migration background. For migration studies this “city focus” represents more and more a key premise for conducting research: migration is basically seen as an urban phenomenon.

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Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781351108478-1, hdl.handle.net/1765/113570
Citation
Caponio, T, Scholten, P.W.A, & R. Zapata-Barrero (Ricard). (2018). Introduction: The Routledge handbook of the governance of migration and diversity in cities. In The Routledge handbook of the governance of migration and diversity in cities. doi:10.4324/9781351108478-1