Although recent work has begun to establish that early modern plagues had selective mortality effects, it was generally accepted that the initial outbreak of Black Death in 1347‐52 was a “universal killer.” Recent bioarchaeological work, however, has argued that the Black Death was also selective with regard to age and pre‐plague health status. The issue of the Black Death's potential sex selectivity is less clear. Bioarchaeological research hypothesizes that sex‐selection in mortality was possible during the initial Black Death outbreak, and we present evidence from historical sources to test this notion.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.23266, hdl.handle.net/1765/114829
Journal American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Citation
Curtis, D.R, & Roosen, J. (2017). The Sex-Selective Impact of the Black Death and Recurring Plagues in the Southern Netherlands, 1349-1450. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 164(2), 246–259. doi:10.1002/ajpa.23266