These days, it appears to be common ground that what is illegal and punishable offline must also be treated as such in online formats. However, the enforcement of laws in the field of hate speech and fake news in social networks faces a number of challenges. Public policy makers increasingly rely on the regu-lation of user generated online content through private entities, i.e. through social networks as intermediaries. With this privat-ization of law enforcement, state actors hand the delicate bal-ancing of (fundamental) rights concerned off to private entities. Different strategies complementing traditional law enforcement mechanisms in Europe will be juxtaposed and analysed with particular regard to their respective incentive structures and consequential dangers for the exercise of fundamental rights. Propositions for a recommendable model honouring both pri-vate and public responsibilities will be presented.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.5553/ELR.000115, hdl.handle.net/1765/115659
Series Erasmus Law Review
Journal Erasmus Law Review
Citation
Kaesling, K. (2019). Privatising Law Enforcement in Social Networks: A Comparative Model Analysis. Erasmus Law Review, 11(3), 151–164. doi:10.5553/ELR.000115