The present study aimed to investigate the factors associated with early introduction of complementary feeding (i.e., before age 4 months), and factors associated with infants consumption of non-recommended foods, including sweet beverages and snack foods. Methods: This study used cross-sectional data from the BeeBOFT study (n = 2157). Data on complementary feeding practices and potential determinants were obtained by questionnaire at infant’s age of 6 months. Logistic regression models were used to investigate factors associated with early introduction of complementary feeding and infants’ consumption of non-recommended foods. Results: 21.4% of infants had received complementary feeding before 4 months of age. At the age of 6 months, 20.2% of all infants were consuming sweet beverages daily and 16.5% were consuming snack foods daily. Younger maternal age, lower maternal educational level, absence or shorter duration of breastfeeding, parental conviction that “my child always wants to eat when he/she sees someone eating” and not attending day-care were independently associated with both early introduction of complementary feeding and the consumption of non-recommended foods. Higher maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and infant postnatal weight gain were associated only with early introduction of complementary feeding. Conclusions: We identified several demographical, biological, behavioral, psychosocial, and social factors associated with inappropriate complementary feeding practices. These findings are relevant for designing intervention programs aimed at educating parents.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Introduction of complementary feeding, Sweet beverage, Snack foods, Risk factors
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-6722-4, hdl.handle.net/1765/116223
Journal BMC Public Health
Citation
Wang, L, van Grieken, A, van der Velde, L.A., Vlasblom, J.D, Beltman, P.A, l' Hoir, M.P, … Raat, H. (2019). Factors associated with early introduction of complementary feeding and consumption of non-recommended foods among Dutch infants: the BeeBOFT study. BMC Public Health, 19. doi:10.1186/s12889-019-6722-4