Background: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early esophageal and stomach cancer is usually performed under general anesthesia. However, propofol sedation without endotracheal intubation has been suggested as a viable alternative. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety of propofol sedation without endotracheal intubation during ESD in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent ESD for upper gastrointestinal tumors with propofol-remifentanil analgosedation in a tertiary referral center in the Netherlands between October 2013 and February 2018. Primary endpoints were the rates of intraprocedural endoscopy- and anesthesia-related complications. Secondary endpoints were the postprocedural complication rates within 30 days and endotracheal intubation conversion rates. Results: Of 88 patients, intraprocedural ESD-related complications occurred in three patients (3.4%). Intraprocedural anesthesia-related complications occurred in two patients (2.3%), one of whom required conversion to endotracheal intubation. Postprocedural ESD-related complications occurred in 14 patients (15.9%), and minor postprocedural complications occurred in two patients (2.3%). Eighty-two (93.2%) patients were discharged within one day after ESD. No patient was readmitted for anesthesia-related complications. Conclusion: Propofol-based sedation without endotracheal intubation is safe for ESD procedures in the esophagus and stomach with low anesthesia-related complication rates and short hospital stay

Additional Metadata
Keywords Complications, endoscopic submucosal dissection, esophageal cancer, propofol sedation, stomach cancer
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1177/2050640619831126, hdl.handle.net/1765/116322
Journal United European gastroenterology journal
Citation
van de Ven, S.E.M., Leliveld, L., Klimek, M, Hilkemeijer, T.R.H., Bruno, M.J, & Koch, A.D. (2019). Propofol sedation without endotracheal intubation is safe for endoscopic submucosal dissection in the esophagus and stomach. United European gastroenterology journal, 7(3), 405–411. doi:10.1177/2050640619831126