The cerebellum is best known for its role in controlling motor behaviors. However, recent work supports the view that it also influences non-motor behaviors. The contribution of the cerebellum towards different brain functions is underscored by its involvement in a diverse and increasing number of neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions including ataxia, dystonia, essential tremor, Parkinson’s disease (PD), epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, autism spectrum disorders, dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and schizophrenia. Although there are no cures for these conditions, cerebellar stimulation is quickly gaining attention for symptomatic alleviation, as cerebellar circuitry has arisen as a promising target for invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation. This consensus paper brings together experts from the fields of neurophysiology, neurology, and neurosurgery to discuss recent efforts in using the cerebellum as a therapeutic intervention. We report on the most advanced techniques for manipulating cerebellar circuits in humans and animal models and define key hurdles and questions for moving forward.

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Keywords Cerebellum, DBS, Neuromodulation, Neurostimulation, Non-invasive therapy, Optogenetics
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12311-019-01041-5, hdl.handle.net/1765/117301
Journal The Cerebellum
Citation
Miterko, L.N. (Lauren N.), Baker, K.B. (Kenneth B.), Beckinghausen, J. (Jaclyn), Bradnam, L.V. (Lynley V.), Cheng, M.Y. (Michelle Y.), Cooperrider, J. (Jessica), … Sillitoe, R.V. (Roy V.). (2019). Consensus Paper: Experimental Neurostimulation of the Cerebellum. The Cerebellum. doi:10.1007/s12311-019-01041-5