This article provides an overview of the developments about the armed on-board protection of Dutch vessels under Dutch law. The Dutch position has changed over the years. In 2011, the starting point was that private security companies (PSCs) are not to be allowed. It was expected that adequate protection of Dutch vessels could be provided by vessel protection detachments (VPDs). Although not considered as an absolute statutory bar, the state monopoly on force was considered the main argument against PSCs. After optimising the use of VPDs and given the development in other countries, the approach changed into a ‘VPS, unless …’-approach. Under the new Protection of Merchant Shipping Act that is expected to come into force in the second half of 2019, PSCs can be employed only if no VPS is available. This article gives an overview of the argumentation in this change of view over the years. It also explores the headlines, criteria and procedures of the new law and some other topics, including the position of the master under the upcoming law. In line with the other country reports, it enables the comparative study in the last article of this special issue.

Additional Metadata
Keywords vessel protection, private armed guards, state, monopoly on force, masters position, state control
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.5553/ELR.000130, hdl.handle.net/1765/119118
Series Erasmus Law Review
Journal Erasmus Law Review
Citation
Mevis, P.A.M, & Eckhardt, S.A. (2019). Armed On-board Protection of Dutch Vessels: Not Allowed Yet But Probably Forthcoming. Erasmus Law Review, 11(4), 258–266. doi:10.5553/ELR.000130