Marxists believe that an understanding of human society presupposes an understanding of the nature of the production of its material surplus and the nature of control over that surplus. This belief forms part of the “hard core” of the Marxist scientific research program. This hard core is complemented by a set of auxiliary hypotheses and heuristics, constituting what Imre Lakatos has called a scientific research program’s “protective belt.” The protective belt is a set of hypotheses protecting a research program’s hard core. Over the past century and a half, Marxists have populated the protective belt with an economic theory, a theory of history, a theory of exploitation, and a philosophical anthropology, among other things. Analytical Marxism is located in Marxism’s protective belt. It can be seen as a painstaking exercise in intellectual housekeeping. The exercise consists in replacing the tradition’s antiquated, superfluous, or degenerate furnishings with concepts, methods, and auxiliary hypotheses from analytic philosophy and up-to-date social science. The three most influential strands in analytical Marxism are, roughly: its reconstruction of Marx’s theory of history, historical materialism; its philosophical anthropology, including the theory of freedom; and its theory of exploitation, including the theory of class.

Additional Metadata
Keywords reedom, egalitarianism, exploitation, domination, critical theory, labor theory of value, Karl Marx
ISBN 978-0-19-063258-8
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.013.199, hdl.handle.net/1765/119500
Citation
Vrousalis, N. (2016). Analytical Marxism. In Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Politics. doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780190228637.013.199