bjective: To assess the proportion of all medication error reports in hospitals and primary care that involved an anticoagulant. Secondary objectives were the anticoagulant involved, phase of the medication process in which the error occurred, causes and consequences of 1000 anticoagulant medication errors. Additional secondary objectives were the total number of anticoagulant medication error reports per month, divided by the total number of medication error reports per month and the proportion of causes of 1000 anticoagulant medication errors (comparing the preand post-guideline phase). Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Medication errors reported to the Central Medication incidents Registration reporting system. Participants: Between December 2012 and May 2015, 42 962 medication errors were reported to the CMR. Intervention: N/A. Main outcome measure: Proportion of all medication error reports that involved an anticoagulant. Phase of the medication process in which the error occurred, causes and consequences of 1000 anticoagulant medication errors. The total number of anticoagulant medication error reports per month, divided by the total number of medication error reports per month (comparing the preand post-guideline phase) and the total number of causes of 1000 anticoagulant medication errors before and after introduction of the LSKA 2.0 guideline. Results: Anticoagulants were involved in 8.3% of the medication error reports. A random selection of 1000 anticoagulant medication error reports revealed that low-molecular weight heparins were most often involved in the error reports (56.2%). Most reports concerned the prescribing phase of the medication process (37.1%) and human factors were the leading cause of medication errors mentioned in the reports (53.4%). Publication of the national guideline on integrated antithrombotic care had no effect on the proportion of anticoagulant medication error reports. Human factors were the leading cause of medication errors before and after publication of the guideline. Conclusions: Anticoagulant medication errors occurred in 8.3% of all medication errors. Most error reports concerned the prescribing phase of the medication process. Leading cause was human factors. The publication of the guideline had no effect on the proportion of anticoagulant medication errors.

Additional Metadata
Keywords medical errors, patient safety, guidelines, appropriate health care
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1093/intqhc/mzy177, hdl.handle.net/1765/121098
Journal International Journal for Quality in Health Care
Citation
Dreijer, A.R, Diepstraten, J, Bukkems, V.E., Mol, P.G.M, Leebeek, F.W.G, Kruip, M.J.H.A, & van den Bemt, P.M.L.A. (2018). Anticoagulant medication errors in hospitals and primary care: a cross-sectional study. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 31(5), 346–352. doi:10.1093/intqhc/mzy177