The aim of the present study was to examine the relationships between daily exposure to negative acts and depressed mood on the same day and on the days following the exposure, and to test the hypothesis that these relationships would be stronger among those who have recently gone through a process of victimization from workplace bullying. The sample comprised 110 naval cadets participating in two different eleven-week tall ship voyages from Northern Europe to North America. Victimization from workplace bullying the last six months was measured one day prior to the voyages. Exposure to negative acts and depressed mood was measured daily during the first 33 consecutive days of the voyages. The results of multilevel modelling indicated that exposure to negative acts was related to higher levels of depressed mood on the same day as the exposure among all cadets, regardless of victimization status. However, exposure to negative acts predicted higher levels of depressed mood one and two days following the exposure among victims only. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Workplace bullying, depressed mood, negative acts, vulnerability, diary study
Persistent URL hdl.handle.net/1765/122572
Journal European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology
Citation
Hoprekstad, O.L., Hetland, J, Bakker, A.B, Kjellevold-Olsen, O., Espevik, R., van Wessel, M., & Valvatne Einarsen, S. (2019). How long does it last? Prior victimization from workplace bullying moderates the relationship between daily exposure to negative acts and subsequent depressed mood. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 28, 164–178. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1765/122572