Aim: Investigate the potential role of OPRM1 (mu-opioid receptor) and COMT (catechol-O-methyltransferase enzyme) polymorphisms in postoperative acute, chronic and experimental thermal pain. Methods: A secondary analysis of 125 adult cardiac surgery patients that were randomized between fentanyl and remifentanil during surgery and genotyped. Results: Patients in the fentanyl group with the COMT high-pain sensitivity haplotype required less postoperative morphine compared with the average-pain sensitivity haplotype (19.4 [16.5; 23.0] vs 34.6 [26.2; 41.4]; p = 0.00768), but not to the low-pain sensitivity group (30.1 [19.1; 37.7]; p = 0.13). No association was found between COMT haplotype and other pain outcomes or OPRM1 polymorphisms and the different pain modalities. Conclusion: COMT haplotype appears to explain part of the variability in acute postoperative pain in adult cardiac surgery patients.

adverse drug reactions, drug transporter genes, pain
dx.doi.org/10.2217/pgs-2019-0141, hdl.handle.net/1765/124188
Pharmacogenomics
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Department of Clinical Chemistry

Matić, M, de Hoogd, S, de Wildt, S.N, Tibboel, D, Knibbe, C.A.J, & van Schaik, R.H.N. (2020). OPRM1 and COMT polymorphisms: Implications on postoperative acute, chronic and experimental pain after cardiac surgery. Pharmacogenomics, 21(3), 181–193. doi:10.2217/pgs-2019-0141