This article examines the adaptation and biomedical transition of people living with HIV (PLHIV) to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Burkina Faso. The study employs a representative sample of 3625 randomly selected patients. Subjective and objective measures of health and their predictors are compared for short-term (≤24 months) versus longer-term ART adherents (>24 months) in a cohort study. Subjective health is measured as Likert scale self-rating and objective health as CD4 count. The results show that subjective and objective health capture different aspects of adaptation to ART: 90% of the short-term and 94% of the longer-term patients give a subjective health rating of at least good, while the objective measure of good health is higher among longer-term (42%) compared to short-term patients (27%). For subjective health, short-lived pleasures are predictors among short-term adherents while economic characteristics are determinants among longer-term patients. Meanwhile, objective health is associated with factors that determine ART adherence (i.e. participating in self-help groups). To achieve a wholistic resilience management that caters to the needs of PLHIV, we need to acknowledge adaptation to the disease and to ART and design health programs, in particular in developing countries, away from on-size-fits-all solutions to stage-of-disease specific support.

Additional Metadata
Keywords adaptation and biomedical transition, ART, Burkina Faso, PLHIV, Response shift
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1080/17441692.2019.1704819, hdl.handle.net/1765/124283
Journal Global Public Health
Citation
Artavia-Mora, L.D, Wagner, N, Thiombiano, B.A. (Boundia Alexandre), & Bedi, A.S. (2020). Adaptation and biomedical transition of people living with HIV to antiretroviral treatment in Burkina Faso. Global Public Health. doi:10.1080/17441692.2019.1704819