People with intellectual disabilities (ID) have unhealthier lifestyles than the general population. To sustainably improve their lifestyle and health status, a whole-system approach to creating healthy environments is crucial. To gain insight into how support for physical activity and healthy nutrition can be embedded in a setting, asset mapping can be helpful. Asset mapping involves creating a bottom-up overview of promoting and protective factors for health. However, there is no asset mapping tool available for ID support settings. This study aims to develop an asset mapping tool in collaboration with people with ID to gain insight into assets for healthy nutrition and physical activity in such settings. The tool is based on previous research and development continued in an iterative and inclusive process in order to create a clear, comprehensive, and usable tool. Expert interviews (n = 7), interviews with end-users (n = 7), and pilot testing (n = 16) were conducted to refine the tool. Pilot participants perceived the tool as helpful in pinpointing perceived assets and in prompting ideas on how to create inclusive environments with support for physical activity and healthy nutrition. This overview of assets can be helpful for mobilizing assets and building the health-promoting capacities of ID support settings.

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Keywords community participation, context-based interventions, empowerment, health assets, health promotion, inclusion, inclusive research, intellectual disability, lifestyle, settings approach
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030794, hdl.handle.net/1765/124592
Journal International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Citation
Vlot-van Anrooij, K. (Kristel), Hilgenkamp, T.I.M, Leusink, G.L. (Geraline L.), van der Cruijsen, A. (Anneke), Jansen, H. (Henk), Naaldenberg, J. (Jenneken), & van der Velden, K. (Koos). (2020). Improving Environmental Capacities for Health Promotion in Support Settings for People with Intellectual Disabilities: Inclusive Design of the DIHASID Tool. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(3). doi:10.3390/ijerph17030794