Aim: As nowadays more children survive neonatal critical illness, evaluation of long-term morbidities becomes more important. We determined whether the parent-reported Movement Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (MABC-2) Checklist is a proper tool to screen for motor problems in school-aged children born with severe anatomical anomalies and/or treated with neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Methods: We analysed data of 190/253 children (60.0% male) participating in our multidisciplinary follow-up programme who were routinely assessed at the ages of five, eight and/or 12 years. Parents completed the Checklist prior to assessment of the child's actual motor performance by a physical therapist using the MABC-2 Test. The sensitivity and specificity of the Checklist with a cut-off point of the 16th percentile were determined. Results: The sensitivity of the MABC-2 Checklist was 57.1%, which implies that 42.9% of the children at risk for motor problems were not identified. The specificity was 79.1%. Conclusions: The low sensitivity of the MABC-2 Checklist suggests that this instrument does not suffice to screen for motor problems in children who survived neonatal critical illness. Yet, it may help to gain insight in parental perceptions of the child's motor performance and to provide tailored advice on lifestyle.

Additional Metadata
Keywords motor performance, Movement Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition Checklist, Movement Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition Test, neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, severe congenital anatomical anomalies
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1111/apa.15192, hdl.handle.net/1765/125209
Journal Acta Paediatrica: promoting child health
Citation
Toussaint-Duyster, L.C.C. (Leontien C. C.), van der Cammen-van Zijp, M.H.M, Tibboel, D, Gischler, S.J, van Rosmalen, J.M, & IJsselstijn, H. (2020). A parent-reported standardised checklist is not sensitive to screen for motor problems at school age following neonatal critical illness. Acta Paediatrica: promoting child health. doi:10.1111/apa.15192