The study of team diversity has generated a large amount of research because of the changing nature of workplaces as they become more diverse and work becomes more organized around teams. Team diversity describes the variation among team members in terms of any attribute in which individuals may differ. Examples are demographic background diversity, functional or educational diversity, and personality diversity. Diversity can be operationalized as categorical (variety), continuous (separation), or vertical (disparity).

Initial research on team diversity was dominated by a main-effects approach that produced two main perspectives: social-categorization scholars suggested that diversity hurts team outcomes, as it decreases feelings of cohesion and increases dysfunctional conflict, whereas the information and decision-making perspective suggested that diversity helps team outcomes, as it makes more information available in the team to help with decision-making. In an effort to integrate these disparate insights, the categorization-elaboration model (CEM) proposed that team diversity can lead both to social categorization and to information elaboration on the basis of contextual factors that may give rise to either process. The CEM has received widespread support in research, but a number of questions about the processes through which diversity has an effect on team outcomes remain.

Additional Metadata
Keywords team, diversity, social categorization, information elaboration, performance
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1093/acrefore/9780190224851.013.51, hdl.handle.net/1765/127627
Citation
Schouten, M. E., Khattab, J, & Pahng, P. (2020). Managing Team Diversity in the Workplace. In Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Business and Management. doi:10.1093/acrefore/9780190224851.013.51