Background: While multiple studies have examined the cost of health care for one aspect of sickle cell disease care, few have focussed on the overall cost of comprehensive care for sickle cell disease. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children with sickle cell disease treated in a comprehensive care centre from 1 January 2015 to 31 December 2016. Health care utilisation of included patients was based upon data from two main sources. The clinical practice guideline was used to determine the expected resource use of routine comprehensive care (planned elective care), and the financial claims database was used to estimate real-world resource use associated with acute and inpatient care (additional care). Results: A total of 125 children with sickle cell disease were analysed. Expenditures for these patients averaged €5049 [standard deviation (SD) €1634] per child per year. Total yearly costs per patient varied considerably, ranging from €669 to €84 010, and less than 15% of patients were responsible for 50% of the health care costs. The majority (37%) of costs was associated with inpatient hospital care, which increased by age group, 27% with diagnostics, 19% with treatment, 11% with outpatients’ visits and 6% with emergency care. Conclusion: We have described real-world resource use and expenditures for children with sickle cell disease in a European comprehensive care centre. It seems that costs of a comprehensive approach with effective management in the outpatient setting is favourable when compared to episodic health care.

Additional Metadata
Keywords comprehensive care, health care costs, resource use, sickle cell disease
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.28588, hdl.handle.net/1765/129008
Journal Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Organisation Erasmus University Rotterdam
Citation
Thielen, F.W, Houwing, M.E, Cnossen, M.H, al Hadithy-Irgiztseva, I.A. (Ilona A.), Hazelzet, J.A, Groot, C.A.U.-D. (Carin A. Uyl-de), … Blommestein, H.M. (2020). Cost of health care for paediatric patients with sickle cell disease: An analysis of resource use and costs in a European country. Pediatric Blood & Cancer. doi:10.1002/pbc.28588