In the Netherlands, there is an increasing need for collective forms of housing for older people. Such housing bridges the gap between the extremes of living in an institutionalised setting and remaining in their own house. The demand is related to the closure of many residential care homes and the need for social engagement with other residents. This study focuses on housing initiatives that offer innovative and alternative forms of independent living, which deviate from mainstream housing arrangements. It draws on recent literature on healthcare ‘rebels’ and further develops the concept of ‘rebellion’ in the context of housing. The main research question is how founders dealt with challenges of establishing and governing ‘rebellious’ innovative living arrangements for older people in the highly regulated context of housing and care in the Netherlands. Qualitative in-depth interviews with 17 founders (social entrepreneurs, directors and supervisory board members) were conducted. Founders encountered various obstacles that are often related to governmental and sectoral rules and regulations. Their stories demonstrate the opportunities and constraints of innovative entrepreneurship at the intersection of housing and care. The study concludes with the notion of ‘responsible rebellion’ and practical lessons about dealing with rules and regulations and creating supportive contexts.

Additional Metadata
Keywords Assisted living facilities, Dwellings, Elderly, Governance, Group living, Homes, Housing, Law, Older people, Rebellion, Regulations, Seniors
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176235, hdl.handle.net/1765/130065
Journal International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Citation
Rusinovic, K.M, van Bochove, M.E, Koops-Boelaars, S. (Suzanna), Tavy, Z.K.C.T. (Zsuzsu K.C.T.), & Hoof, J. (Joost van). (2020). Towards responsible rebellion: How founders deal with challenges in establishing and governing innovative living arrangements for older people. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(17), 1–15. doi:10.3390/ijerph17176235