Objective This scoping review aimed to explore and describe the research on associations between person- centred care (PCC) and healthcare provider outcomes, for example, job satisfaction and work- related health.
Design Scoping review.
Eligibility criteria Studies were included if they were empirical studies that analysed associations between PCC measurement tools and healthcare providers outcomes.
Search strategy Searches in PubMed, CINAHL, Psychinfo and SCOPUS databases were conducted to identify relevant studies published between 2001 and 2019. Two authors independently screened studies for inclusion.
Results Eighteen studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Twelve studies were cross- sectional, four quasi- experimental, one longitudinal and one randomised controlled trial. The studies were carried out in Sweden, The Netherlands, the USA, Australia, Norway and Germany in residential care, nursing homes, safety net clinics, a hospital and community care. The healthcare provider outcomes consisted of job satisfaction, burnout, stress of conscience, psychosocial work environment, job strain and intent to leave. The cross- sectional studies found significant associations, whereas the longitudinal studies revealed no significant effects of PCC on healthcare provider outcomes over time.
Conclusion Most studies established a positive association between PCC and healthcare provider outcomes. However, due to the methodological variation, a robust conclusion could not be generated. Further research is required to establish the viability of implementing PCC for the improvement of job satisfaction and work- related health outcomes through rigorous and consistent research.

preventive medicine, public health, quality in health care, social medicine
dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2020-042658, hdl.handle.net/1765/132219
BMJ Open
Erasmus School of Health Policy & Management (ESHPM)

van Diepen, C.A.M, Fors, A, Ekman, I, & Hensing, G. (2020). Association between person-centred care and healthcare providers’ job satisfaction and work-related health. BMJ Open, 10(12). doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2020-042658