Objectives: This study aimed to comprehensively compare the clinical features of hospitalized COVID-19 patients with hospitalized 2009 influenza pandemic patients. Methods: Medline, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane CENTRAL, and Google scholar were systematically searched to identify studies related to COVID-19 and the 2009 influenza pandemic. The pooled incidence rates of clinical features were estimated using the DerSimonian-Laird random-effects model with the Freeman-Tukey double arcsine transformation method. Results: The incidence rates of fever, cough, shortness of breath, sore throat, rhinorrhea, myalgia/muscle pain, or vomiting were found to be significantly higher in influenza patients when compared with COVID-19 patients. The incidence rates of comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease/hypertension and diabetes, were significantly higher in COVID-19 compared with influenza patients. In contrast, comorbidities such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and immunocompromised conditions were significantly more common in influenza compared with COVID-19 patients. Unexpectedly, the estimated rates of intensive care unit admission, treatment with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, treatment with antibiotics, and fatality were comparable between hospitalized COVID-19 and 2009 influenza pandemic patients. Conclusions: This study comprehensively estimated the differences and similarities of the clinical features and burdens of hospitalized COVID-19 and 2009 influenza pandemic patients. This information will be important to better understand the current COVID-19 pandemic.

2009 influenza pandemic, Clinical features, Comorbidities, COVID-19, Meta-analysis, Symptoms
dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2020.11.127, hdl.handle.net/1765/132602
International Journal of Infectious Diseases
Department of Gastroenterology & Hepatology

Li, P. (Pengfei), Wang, Y. (Yining), Peppelenbosch, M.P. (Maikel P.), Ma, Z. (Zhongren), & Pan, Q. (2021). Systematically comparing COVID-19 with the 2009 influenza pandemic for hospitalized patients. International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 102, 375–380. doi:10.1016/j.ijid.2020.11.127