In Chile and Ecuador, multiple hazards and dynamic processes in vulnerability pose a high risk. Spatial planning and emergency management can contribute to disaster risk management but they follow different goals. However, global goals, such as from UN-ISDR (United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Risk Reduction) and UN SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals) can potentially support cities and regions in defining concerted action. This paper aims at measuring the performance of Chile and Ecuador in regard to the aforementioned policy goals. Although both countries show considerable progresses in the implementation of the UN strategies, it is doubtful that the existing global monitoring approach is appropriately designed for measuring the real situation on the ground. Our paper is based on a desktop research combined with stakeholder workshops and expert interviews. Overall, both countries made considerable progress in regard to disaster preparedness and monitoring. However, multi-risks are rarely considered and there is still increasing vulnerability due to the expansion of informal settlements. The risk management is characterized by an imbalanced distribution of financial resources and institutional capacities between the metropolitan regions and smaller municipalities, and by low public participation and hardly community-based approaches. The paper underlines the importance for more qualitative, in-depth studies on the root causes of disaster risk which could complement the global monitoring which is very much focused on quantitative data and shows inconsistency between input and output indicators.

Disaster management, Disaster risk, Monitoring, Risk assessment, SDGs, UN-ISDR, Vulnerability
dx.doi.org/10.3390/su13031366, hdl.handle.net/1765/134436
Sustainability (Switzerland)

Greiving, S. (Stefan), Schödl, L. (Leonie), Gaudry, K.-H. (Karl-Heinz), Miralles, I.K.Q. (Iris Katherine Quintana), Larraín, B.P. (Benjamín Prado), Fleischhauer, M. (Mark), … Tobar, J. (Jonathan). (2021). Multi-risk assessment and management—a comparative study of the current state of affairs in chile and ecuador. Sustainability (Switzerland), 13(3), 1–23. doi:10.3390/su13031366