Study objective: We measure the effect of video discharge instructions on postconcussion symptoms in patients with mild traumatic brain injury in the emergency department. Methods: A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted in which patients with mild traumatic brain injury were randomly assigned to either intervention (verbal, written, and video discharge information) or control (verbal and written discharge information only). All patients were interviewed 1 week and 3 months from randomization. Primary outcome measure was the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire at 3 months. Secondary outcomes were correct recall, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale score, health-related quality of life (12-Item Short Form Health Survey), return visits, and patient satisfaction. Results: A total of 2,883 patients were assessed for eligibility, of whom 381 were included in the control group and 390 in the video intervention group. Difference in mean total Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire score between the 2 groups was 0.2 at 1 week and 0.3 at 3 months after traumatic brain injury (estimated effect –0.7; 95% confidence interval –2.1 to 0.7). There was also no difference in Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale score, recall, 12-Item Short Form Health Survey score, return visits, and patient satisfaction between the control and intervention group. Conclusion: Severity of postconcussion symptoms in patients with mild traumatic brain injury did not improve by adding video information to standard care. Also, there was no difference in recall, health-related quality of life, return visits, and patient satisfaction between the control and intervention groups.

doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2020.10.023, hdl.handle.net/1765/135109
Annals of Emergency Medicine
Department of Emergency Medicine

Hoek, A.E, Joosten, A-M.S, Dippel, D.W.J, van Beeck, E.F, van den Hengel, L.C, Dijkstra, B. (Björn), … Rood, P.P.M. (2021). Effect of Video Discharge Instructions for Patients With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 77(3), 327–337. doi:10.1016/j.annemergmed.2020.10.023