ABSTRACT <br/> The ‘Easterlin paradox’ holds that economic growth does not add to the quality-of-life and that this appears in the fact that average happiness in nations has not risen in the last few decades. The latest trend data show otherwise. Average happiness has increased slightly in rich nations and considerably in the few poor nations for which data are available. Since longevity has also increased, the average number of happy life years has increased at an unprecedented rate since the 1950s.

Easterlin paradox, cross national, economic growth, happiness, life satisfaction, progress, quality-of-life, social indicator, social progress, subjective well-being, trend in happiness, trend over time
dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11205-005-5074-x, hdl.handle.net/1765/16435
Social Indicators Research: an international and interdisciplinary journal for quality-of-life measurement
[A modern reissue of the text is also included in RePub]
Department of Sociology

Veenhoven, R. (2006). Rising happiness in nations,1946-2004. A reply to Easterlin. Social Indicators Research: an international and interdisciplinary journal for quality-of-life measurement, 79(3), 421–436. doi:10.1007/s11205-005-5074-x