This study investigated the effects of income, health, social capital, marital status, employment, education and crime experience on subjective well-being within a poor community in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. It appeared that higher income is associated with higher subjective well-being and that social capital serves as an important subjective well-being predictor in all income groups. Efforts must be made to ensure that countries do not develop economically at the expense of other aspects of life important for well-being in the very poor, such as social capital.

South Africa, community, development, poorest of the poor, poverty, subjective well-being
dx.doi.org/10.1177/1359105310367833, hdl.handle.net/1765/21303
Journal of Health Psychology: an interdisciplinary, international journal
Department of Psychology

Cramm, J.M, Moller, V, & Nieboer, A.P. (2010). Improving subjective well-being of the poor in the Eastern Cape. Journal of Health Psychology: an interdisciplinary, international journal, 15(7), 1012–1019. doi:10.1177/1359105310367833