This working paper contributes to a collective discussion in a workshop occurring in January 2011 at the International Institute of Social Studies, bringing scholars from Europe and Brazil and aiming inter-university research collaboration on linking policies on social responsibility to development and equity. The paper serves as an introductory discussion for reframing the concept of corporate social responsibility into a broader umbrella concept of multi-actor and multilevel social responsibility in a territorial scope – the Master model, connecting different stakeholders´ social responsibilities to the purpose of development and equity goals at territorial levels. The proposed Master model can be unfolded into parts of: specific layers of territorial scopes; engagement of social actors in the governance arena; delegation of complementary roles; choices of levels of ethical challenges; themes of social responsibility; and development of governance phases. It presents a synthesis and reflection on the current state of the art of the concept and tools of corporate social responsibility and multilevel governance and brings the contribution of a selection of globally referenced frameworks for policies on corporate social responsibility and development and equity goals. The Master model aims to serve as a mapping tool for research and policies purposes on linking social responsibility, governance, development and equity. Comments and contributions from readers are much welcome for future revisions on the paper.

Additional Metadata
Keywords corporate social responsibility, development, equity, multilevel governance, stakeholders
Publisher International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University (ISS)
Persistent URL hdl.handle.net/1765/21969
Series ISS Working Papers - General Series
Journal ISS Working Paper Series / General Series
Citation
Ashley, P.A. (2011). The Master model on multi-actor and multilevel social responsibilities. ISS Working Paper Series / General Series (Vol. 512, pp. 1–21). International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University (ISS). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1765/21969