It has been argued that power activates a general tendency to approach whereas powerlessness activates a tendency to inhibit. The assumption is that elevated power involves reward-rich environments, freedom and, as a consequence, triggers an approach-related motivational orientation and attention to rewards. In contrast, reduced power is associated with increased threat, punishment and social constraint and thereby activates inhibition-related motivation. Moreover, approach motivation has been found to be associated with increased relative left-sided frontal brain activity, while withdrawal motivation has been associated with increased right sided activations. We measured EEG activity while subjects engaged in a task priming either high or low social power. Results show that high social power is indeed associated with greater left-frontal brain activity compared to low social power, providing the first neural evidence for the theory that high power is associated with approach-related motivation. We propose a framework accounting for differences in both approach motivation and goal-directed behaviour associated with different levels of power.

Additional Metadata
Keywords EEC, approach, asymmetry, inhibition, power
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsp006, hdl.handle.net/1765/22404
Series ERIM Article Series (EAS)
Journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (Online)
Note Article in press
Citation
Boksem, M.A.S, Smolders, R, & de Cremer, D. (2009). Social power and approach-related neural activity. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (Online). doi:10.1093/scan/nsp006