Sir: Lymphocytic meningoradiculitis or Bannwarth's syndrome is clinically characterised by severe radicular pains with sensory and motor impairment and cranial nerve palsies, especially unilateral or bilateral facial weakness.'`4 The syndrome is probably a European variety of Lyme disease, 5 which is caused by a spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi,6 and transmitted by the bite of a tick. In Bannwarth's syndrome antibodies to the same7 or to closely related8 spirochetes are found. CSF findings such as elevated protein and pleocytosis' - 3 are consistent with aseptic meningitis. The disease is often self-limiting, but the course of the disease and the duration of pain may be shortened by high doses of penicillin given intravenously. 9 In some cases it may be difficult to distinguish Bannwarth's syndrome from neurosyphilis. We present such a case. ...

Aged, Borrelia Infections/*diagnosis, Diagnosis, Differential, Humans, Male, Meningitis/*diagnosis, Neurosyphilis/*diagnosis, Polyradiculopathy/*diagnosis, Pupil/*physiology
hdl.handle.net/1765/22528
Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry: an international peer-reviewed journal for health professionals and researchers in all areas of neurology and neurosurgery
Erasmus MC: University Medical Center Rotterdam

Koudstaal, P.J, Vermeulen, M.B.M, & Wokke, J.H.J. (1987). Argyll Robertson pupils in lymphocytic meningoradiculitis (Bannwarth's syndrome). Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry: an international peer-reviewed journal for health professionals and researchers in all areas of neurology and neurosurgery, 50(3), 363–365. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1765/22528