Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) H5N1 can infect mammals via the intestine; this is unusual since influenza viruses typically infect mammals via the respiratory tract. The dissemination of HPAIV H5N1 following intestinal entry and associated pathogenesis are largely unknown. To assess the route of spread of HPAIV H5N1 to other organs and to determine its associated pathogenesis, we inoculated infected chicken liver homogenate directly into the intestine of cats by use of entericcoated capsules. Intestinal inoculation of HPAIV H5N1 resulted in fatal systemic disease. The spread of HPAIV H5N1 from the lumen of the intestine to other organs took place via the blood and lymphatic vascular systems but not via neuronal transmission. Remarkably, the systemic spread of the virus via the vascular system was associated with massive infection of endothelial and lymphendothelial cells, resulting in widespread hemorrhages. This is unique for influenza in mammals and resembles the pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in terrestrial poultry. It contrasts with the pathogenesis of systemic disease from the same virus following entry via the respiratory tract, where lesions are characterized mainly by necrosis and inflammation and are associated with the presence of influenza virus antigen in parenchymal, not endothelial cells. The marked endotheliotropism of the virus following intestinal inoculation indicates that the pathogenesis of systemic influenza virus infection in mammals may differ according to the portal of entry. © 2012, American Society for Microbiology.

Endothelial Cells, Influenza A virus, Intestines, Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms, anima, animal, disease models, huma, influenza (human), influenza in birds, virus replication
dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.06375-11, hdl.handle.net/1765/31931
Journal of Virology
Free full text at PubMed
Erasmus MC: University Medical Center Rotterdam

Reperant, L.A, van de Bildt, M.W.G, van Amerongen, G, Leijten, L.M.E, & Watson, S. (2012). Marked endotheliotropism of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 following intestinal inoculation in cats. Journal of Virology, 86(2), 1158–1165. doi:10.1128/JVI.06375-11