Background: The excess risk of bilateral visual impairment (BVI; bilateral visual acuity <0.5) among individuals with amblyopia is an argument for screening for amblyopia, but data are scarce. Methods: The risk was estimated by determining the incidence of BVI in the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort of subjects aged 55 years or over (n = 5220), including 192 individuals with amblyopia (3.7%). Using a multistate lifetable, the lifetime risk and excess period spent with BVI were determined. Results: The relative risk of BVI for amblyopes was 2.6 (95% confidence interval 1.4-4.5). For individuals with amblyopia, the lifetime risk of BVI was 18%, whereas they lived on average 7.2 years with BVI. For non-amblyopic individuals, these figures were 10% and 6.7 years, respectively. Conclusion: Amblyopia nearly doubles the lifetime risk of BVI and affected individuals spent an extra six months with BVI. This study provides data for future cost-effectiveness analyses.

dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjo.2006.113670, hdl.handle.net/1765/35111
British Journal of Ophthalmology: a peer review journal for health professionals and researchers in ophthalmology
Free full text at PubMed
Erasmus MC: University Medical Center Rotterdam

van Leeuwen, R, Eijkemans, M.J.C, Vingerling, J.R, Hofman, A, de Jong, P.T.V.M, & Simonsz, H.J. (2007). Risk of bilateral visual impairment in individuals with amblyopia: The Rotterdam study. British Journal of Ophthalmology: a peer review journal for health professionals and researchers in ophthalmology, 91(11), 1450–1451. doi:10.1136/bjo.2006.113670