Introducing choice and competition in public services was supposed to put citizens in the “driver’s seat”, making them in charge of their service provision. Introducing choice often is indeed beneficial for citizens. However, it sometimes also leads to increased inequality among citizens. This chapter provides an overview of the background, facilitators and pitfalls of choice, illustrated using empirical studies from various sectors (such as education, healthcare and utilities) in various countries. We conclude by arguing that policymakers should make informed decisions regarding choice. Introducing choice can benefit public services, but one should remain cautious for its potential negative effects.

Additional Metadata
Keywords bounded personality, choice, client choice, competition, direct payment, exit, gaming, health care utilities, incentives, inequality, loyalty, market power, marketization, monopoly, performance information, personel care budgets, public sector, public services, school choice, social security, switching costs, voice, work conditions
Publisher Routledge
Persistent URL hdl.handle.net/1765/38785
Note Published in: Tummers, L.G., Jilke, S.R. & Van de Walle, S. (forthcoming 2013). Citizens in charge? Reviewing the background and value of introducing choice and competition in public services. In Y.K. Dwivedi, M.A. Shareef, S.K. Pandey & V. Kumar (Eds.), Public Administration Reformation: Market Demand from Public Organizations. London: Routledge.
Citation
Tummers, L.G, Jilke, S.R, & Van de Walle, S.G.J. (2013). Citizens in charge? Reviewing the background and value of introducing choice and competition in public services. In Public Administration Reformation: Market Demand from Public Organizations. Routledge. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1765/38785