I present an alternative account of causation in the biomedical and social sciences according to which the meaning of causal claims is given by their inferential relations to other claims. Specifically, I will argue that causal claims are (typically) inferentially related to certain evidential claims as well as claims about explanation, prediction, intervention and responsibility. I explain in some detail what it means for a claim to be inferentially related to another and finally derive some implication of the proposed account for the epistemology, semantics and metaphysics of causation.

Biomedical sciences, Causation, Evidence, Inference, Objectivity, Social sciences
dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.shpsc.2012.05.005, hdl.handle.net/1765/39320
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C :Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences
Erasmus Research Institute of Management

Reiss, J.P. (2012). Causation in the sciences: An inferentialist account. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C :Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 43(4), 769–777. doi:10.1016/j.shpsc.2012.05.005