Objectives. This study evaluated the relative merits of the most frequently used techniques for predicting improvement in regional contractile function after coronary revascularization in patients with left ventricular dysfunction due to chronic coronary artery disease. Background. Several techniques have been proposed for predicting improvement in regional contractile function after revascularization, including thallium-201 (TI- 201) stress-redistribution-reinjection, T1-201 rest-redistribution, fluorine- 18 fluorodeoxyglucose with positron emission tomography, technetium-99m sestamibi imaging and low dose dobutamine echocardiography (LODE). Methods. A systematic review of all reports on prediction of functional recovery after revascularization in patients with chronic coronary artery disease (published between 1980 and March 1997) revealed 37 with sufficient details for calculating the sensitivity and specificity of each imaging morality. From the pooled data, 95% and 99% confidence intervals were also calculated. Results. Sensitivity for predicting regional functional recovery after revascularization was high for all techniques. The specificity of both T1- 201 protocols was significantly lower (p < 0.05) and LDDE significantly higher (p < 0.01) than that of the other techniques. Conclusions. Pooled analysis of 37 studies showed that although all techniques accurately identify segments with improved contractile function after revascularization, the T1-201 protocols may overestimate functional recovery. The evidence available thus far indicates that LDDE appears to have the highest predictive accuracy.

Additional Metadata
Persistent URL dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0735-1097(97)00352-5, hdl.handle.net/1765/56524
Journal Journal of the American College of Cardiology
Citation
Bax, J.J, Wijns, W, Cornel, J.H, Visser, F.C, Boersma, H, & Fioretti, P.M. (1997). Accuracy of currently available techniques for prediction of functional recovery after revascularization in patients with left ventricular dysfunction due to chronic coronary artery disease: Comparison of pooled data. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 30(6), 1451–1460. doi:10.1016/S0735-1097(97)00352-5