Adaptation of the scapula bone tissue to mechanical loading is simulated in the current study using a subject-specific three-dimensional finite element model of an intact cadaveric scapula. The loads experienced by the scapula during different types of movements are determined using a subject-specific large-scale musculoskeletal model of the shoulder joint. The obtained density distributions are compared with the CT-measured density distribution of the same scapula. Furthermore, it is assumed that the CT-measured density distribution can be estimated as a weighted linear combination of the density distributions calculated for different loads experienced during daily life. An optimization algorithm is used to determine the weighting factors of fourteen different loads such that the difference between the weighted linear combination of the calculated density distributions and the CT-measured density is minimal. It is shown that the weighted linear combination of the calculated densities matches the CT-measured density distribution better than every one of the density distributions calculated for individual movements. The weighting factors of nine out of fourteen loads were estimated to be zero or very close to zero. The five loads that had larger weighting factors were associated with either one of the following categories: (1) small-load small-angle abduction or flexion movements that occur frequently during our daily lives or (2) large-load large-angle abduction or flexion movements that occur infrequently during our daily lives.

Bone tissue adaptation, Finite element, Optimization process, Patient-specific, Scapula, Shoulder joint
dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2013.07.024, hdl.handle.net/1765/61969
Journal of Biomechanics
Department of Orthopaedics

Campoli, G, Weinans, H.H, van der Helm, F.C.T, & Zadpoor, A.A. (2013). Subject-specific modeling of the scapula bone tissue adaptation. Journal of Biomechanics, 46(14), 2434–2441. doi:10.1016/j.jbiomech.2013.07.024