Purpose: We determined if and to what extent longitudinal changes in lower urinary tract symptoms are related to disease specific and generic quality of life in men. Material and Methods: A longitudinal, population based study with a followup of 4.2 years was done in 1,688 who were 50 to 79 years old. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires, including the Sickness Impact Profile (3 domains), Inventory of Subjective Health, International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Impact Index. Moreover, they completed various physical and urological measurements. Mean I-PSS and quality of life scores at baseline and followup were analyzed for certain subgroups. Multiple linear regression was used to determine the change in quality of life in relation to baseline I-PSS, I-PSS changes between baseline and followup, and age. Results: Although mean I-PSS increased with time, the average generic quality of life improved and almost a third of the men reported better disease specific quality of life. Multiple linear regression revealed that disease specific quality of life was associated with I-PSS at baseline, changes in I-PSS between baseline and followup, and age. However, generic quality of life scores were not associated with these parameters. Conclusions: Changes in lower urinary tract symptoms severity had little impact on disease specific quality of life in 50 to 79-year-old men or on generic quality of life during the 4.2-year followup. Copyright

Aging, Quality of life, Questionnaires, Urinary tract, Urination disorders
dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ju.0000169256.74421.e5, hdl.handle.net/1765/62698
The Journal of Urology
Department of Medical Psychology and Psychotherapy

Kok, E.T, Bohnen, A.M, Groeneveld, F.P.M.J, van Busschbach, J.J, Blanker, M.H, & Bosch, J.L.H.R. (2005). Changes in disease specific and generic quality of life related to changes in lower urinary tract symptoms: The krimpen study. The Journal of Urology, 174(3), 1055–1058. doi:10.1097/01.ju.0000169256.74421.e5