Malaria-endemic agricultural communities are at risk for this disease because of crop and agricultural activities. A cross-sectional survey among women in small-scale agriculture on irrigated and dryland areas in Makhatini Flats, KwaZulu-Natal South Africa explored associations with self-reported history of malaria, including demographics, crop production, and specific agricultural activities. Ninety-eight (15.2%) of 644 women reported malaria while working in agriculture. More women working in drylands than women working in irrigation scheme reported disease (18.4% versus 10.9%; P < 0.05). Working self or family-owned farms (prevalence ratio [PR] = 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-5.2), spraying pesticides (PR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.4-3.8), cultivating sugar cane (PR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-2.3), and cultivating cotton and mangoes (PR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.1-2.6) were positively associated with a history of malaria while working in agriculture. This study suggests that certain agricultural activities and types of crop production may increase the risk for malaria among women working in small-scale agriculture. Copyright

dx.doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.2011.11-0092, hdl.handle.net/1765/64014
American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Erasmus MC: University Medical Center Rotterdam

Naidoo, S, London, L, Burdorf, A, Naidoo, S, & Kromhout, H. (2011). Occupational activities associated with a reported history of malaria among women working in small-scale agriculture in South Africa. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 85(5), 805–810. doi:10.4269/ajtmh.2011.11-0092