Purpose: To investigate the influence of lifestyle, health, and work conditions in the association between education and productivity loss at work and sick leave. Methods: Employees of six companies filled out a questionnaire on demographics, lifestyle-related, health, and work-related factors, and productivity loss at work and sick leave at baseline (n = 915) and after 1-year (n = 647). Results: Employees with a low education were more likely to report productivity loss at work (OR = 1.49, 95 % CI 0.98-2.26) and sick leave (OR = 1.81, 95 % CI 1.15-2.85). After adjustment for lifestyle, health, and work conditions, the association between education and productivity loss at work did not attenuate. Work conditions attenuated the association between low education and sick leave (OR = 1.62, 95 % CI 1.01-2.61), and additional adjustment for health and lifestyle-related factors further reduced the strength of the association (OR = 1.42, 95 % CI 0.86-2.34). Conclusion: Work conditions and lifestyle-related factors partly explained the association between education and sick leave, but did not influence the association between education and productivity loss at work. The educational differences in sick leave prompt for interventions that address behavioral aspects as well as work-related and lifestyle-related factors.

Education, Inequalities, Productivity loss at work, Sick leave
dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00420-012-0793-1, hdl.handle.net/1765/64678
International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Erasmus MC: University Medical Center Rotterdam

Robroek, S.J.W, van Lenthe, F.J, & Burdorf, A. (2013). The role of lifestyle, health, and work in educational inequalities in sick leave and productivity loss at work. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 86(6), 619–627. doi:10.1007/s00420-012-0793-1