The objective of the study was to assess the association between aspirin use and the risk of stroke in a population-based study in the elderly. The study was carried out within the framework of the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based cohort study. In the total study population there was a weak, nonsignificant association between aspirin use and the risk of stroke (adjusted relative risk 1.29, 95% CI 0.91-1.83). Stratification by history of vascular diseases revealed that aspirin considerably increased the risk of first-ever stroke in subjects free from vascular disease (adjusted relative risk 1.80; 95% CI 1.03-3.13). In persons with vascular disease, no association was observed between aspirin use and risk of stroke (adjusted relative risk 0.99, 95% CI 0.56-1.73). Our findings suggest that aspirin use may increase the risk of stroke in elderly subjects free from vascular disease. Copyright

Aspirin, Cerebrovascular disorders, Cohort studies, Primary prevention
dx.doi.org/10.1159/000054756, hdl.handle.net/1765/66122
Neuroepidemiology
Department of Neurology

Vokó, Z, Koudstaal, P.J, Bots, M.L, Hofman, A, & Breteler, M.M.B. (2001). Aspirin use and risk of stroke in the elderly: The Rotterdam Study. Neuroepidemiology, 20(1), 40–44. doi:10.1159/000054756