Background. Feedback is a strategy that can be used to influence awareness of dietary habits. Feedback was applied in an interactive computer-tailored intervention and in printed self-test forms. Methods. A randomized controlled trial with a 3 (study groups) × 2 (higher vs. medium or lower educational level) design was conducted. Adult subjects (N = 304) were randomly assigned to a feedback group or the control group. Immediate impact on realism of self-rated intake levels of fat, fruit, and vegetables were tested, as were intentions to change. Results. Self-rated fat intake compared to others was more realistic among respondents with a medium or lower educational level in the tailored intervention group. Self-rated fruit intake compared to others was more realistic in the tailored intervention group. Self-rated fat intake was more realistic in the tailored intervention than the self-test group. Intention to reduce fat consumption was greater in the tailored intervention group. Intention to eat more vegetables was greater in the tailored than in the self-test group. Subjects rated the tailored intervention as more effective, more personally relevant, more individualized, and providing more new information. Conclusions. Only the tailored intervention had an immediate impact on awareness and dietary change intention and was appreciated better than both other interventions.

Feedback, Interactive computer tailoring, Nutrition education, Self-test forms
dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0091-7435(02)00043-9, hdl.handle.net/1765/66417
Preventive Medicine
Erasmus MC: University Medical Center Rotterdam

Oenema, A, & Brug, J. (2003). Feedback strategies to raise awareness of personal dietary intake: Results of a randomized controlled trial. Preventive Medicine, 36(4), 429–439. doi:10.1016/S0091-7435(02)00043-9